Jones Ford Buckeye Compares 2017 Ford Fusion VS 2017 Chevrolet Impala Near Goodyear, AZ

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2017 Ford Fusion

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VS

2017 Chevrolet Impala

Safety Comparison

The rear seatbelts optional on the Fusion inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Impala doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Fusion offers all-wheel drive to maximize traction under poor conditions, especially in ice and snow. The Impala doesn’t offer all-wheel drive.

The Fusion (except S) offers optional Reverse Sensing System to help warn the driver about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind or, optionally, in front of the vehicle. The Impala doesn’t offer a front parking aid.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Impala doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Fusion and the Impala have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver and front passenger knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Impala:

 

Fusion

Impala

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

125

229

Neck Compression

24 lbs.

30 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Fusion is safer than the Chevrolet Impala:

 

Fusion

Impala

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

74

75

Chest Movement

1.3 inches

1.3 inches

Hip Force

277 lbs.

332 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Hip Force

790 lbs.

855 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

268

315

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Fusion its highest rating: “Top Pick Plus” for 2016, a rating granted to only 90 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Impala has not been fully tested, yet.

Warranty Comparison

The Fusion’s corrosion warranty is unlimited miles longer than the Impala’s (unlimited vs. 100,000 miles).

Reliability Comparison

A reliable vehicle saves its owner time, money and trouble. Nobody wants to be stranded or have to be without their vehicle while it’s being repaired. Consumer Reports predicts that the Fusion’s reliability will be 22% better than the Impala.

Engine Comparison

The Fusion has more powerful engines than the Impala:

 

Horsepower

Torque

Fusion 2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

245 HP

275 lbs.-ft.

Fusion Sport 2.7 turbo V6

325 HP

350 lbs.-ft.

Impala 2.5 DOHC 4 cyl.

197 HP

191 lbs.-ft.

Impala 3.6 DOHC V6

305 HP

264 lbs.-ft.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Fusion gets better fuel mileage than the Impala:

 

 

Fusion

Impala

 

FWD

2.5 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

21 city/32 hwy

22 city/30 hwy

2.5 4 cyl./Auto

 

1.5 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

23 city/34 hwy

19 city/28 hwy

3.6 V6/Auto

 

2.0 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

21 city/31 hwy

18 city/28 hwy

3.6 V6/Auto

AWD

2.0 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

20 city/29 hwy

n/a

 

The Fusion has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Impala doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Fusion stops shorter than the Impala:

 

Fusion

Impala

 

70 to 0 MPH

175 feet

178 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

125 feet

130 feet

Consumer Reports

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Fusion offers an available driver-adjustable suspension system. It allows the driver to choose between an extra-supple ride, reducing fatigue on long trips, or a sport setting, which allows maximum control for tricky roads. The Impala’s suspension doesn’t offer adjustable shock absorbers.

The Fusion SE handles at .87 G’s, while the Impala LT pulls only .82 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

For better maneuverability, the Fusion’s turning circle is 1.3 feet tighter than the Impala’s (37.5 feet vs. 38.8 feet).

Chassis Comparison

The Ford Fusion may be more efficient, handle and accelerate better because it weighs up to about 250 pounds less than the Chevrolet Impala.

The Fusion is 9.5 inches shorter than the Impala, making the Fusion easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

The front grille of the Fusion uses electronically controlled shutters to close off airflow and reduce drag when less engine cooling is needed. This helps improve highway fuel economy. The Impala doesn’t offer active grille shutters.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Fusion has .1 inches more front hip room, .4 inches more rear headroom and .3 inches more rear hip room than the Impala.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

A low lift-over trunk design makes loading and unloading the Fusion easier. The Fusion’s trunk lift-over height is 24.4 inches, while the Impala’s liftover is 29.4 inches.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Fusion’s front and rear power windows all open or close with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside of the car. The Impala’s passenger windows don’t close automatically.

If the windows are left down on the Fusion the driver can raise them all using the keyless remote; on a hot day the driver can lower the windows. The driver of the Impala can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Fusion SE/Titanium/Sport/Platinum’s exterior keypad. The Impala doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system, and its OnStar® can’t unlock the doors if the vehicle doesn’t have cell phone reception or the driver can’t contact the service.

The Fusion has a standard locking fuel door with a remote release located convenient to the driver. A locking fuel door helps prevent vandalism, such as sugar in the tank and fuel theft. The Impala doesn’t offer a locking fuel door.

The Fusion’s standard speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The Impala’s manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted. The Fusion’s optional wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield.

While driving with high beams on, sensitive light sensors available for the Fusion (except S) detect other vehicles which could be blinded and automatically switch to low beams. The Impala doesn’t offer automatic dimming high beams.

The Fusion (except S)’s optional Active Park Assist can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The Impala doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

Economic Advantages Comparison

The Fusion will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The IntelliChoice estimates that the Fusion will retain 42.62% to 45.98% of its original price after five years, while the Impala only retains 38.73% to 42.59%.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Fusion is less expensive to operate than the Impala because it costs $567 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost much less on the Fusion than the Impala, including $418 less for a water pump, $211 less for an alternator, $100 less for front brake pads, $218 less for a starter, $184 less for fuel injection, $410 less for a fuel pump and $72 less for front struts.

IntelliChoice estimates that five-year ownership costs (depreciation, financing, insurance, fuel, fees, repairs and maintenance) for the Ford Fusion will be $4011 to $5797 less than for the Chevrolet Impala.

Recommendations Comparison

Consumer Reports® recommends both the Ford Fusion and the Chevrolet Impala, based on reliability, safety and performance.

The Fusion Hybrid was chosen as one of Car and Driver’s “Top Ten” in 2010. The Impala has never been a Car and Driver “Top Ten” pick.

Motor Trend selected the Fusion as their 2010 Car of the Year. The Impala has never been chosen.

The Fusion Hybrid was chosen as one of Automobile Magazine’s “All Stars” in 2010. The Impala has never been an “All Star.”

A group of representative automotive journalists from North America selected the Fusion Hybrid as the 2010 North American Car of the Year. The Impala has never been chosen.

The Ford Fusion outsold the Chevrolet Impala by almost three to one during the 2016 model year.

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