Jones Ford Buckeye Compares 2017 Ford Escape VS 2017 Jeep Cherokee Near Avondale, AZ

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2017 Ford Escape

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VS

2017 Jeep Cherokee

Safety Comparison

The Escape Titanium’s optional driver alert monitor detects an inattentive driver then sounds a warning and suggests a break. According to the NHTSA, drivers who fall asleep cause about 100,000 crashes and 1500 deaths a year. The Cherokee doesn’t offer a driver alert monitor.

Both the Escape and the Cherokee have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, front and rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Escape is safer than the Jeep Cherokee:

 

Escape

Cherokee

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

 

Driver

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

Neck Injury Risk

43%

43%

Neck Stress

396 lbs.

430 lbs.

Leg Forces (l/r)

233/311 lbs.

822/607 lbs.

 

Passenger

STARS

4 Stars

4 Stars

Chest Compression

.4 inches

.6 inches

Neck Injury Risk

47%

57%

Neck Stress

175 lbs.

344 lbs.

Neck Compression

106 lbs.

166 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Escape is safer than the Cherokee:

 

Escape

Cherokee

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Restraints

ACCEPTABLE

POOR

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

2 cm

4 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

.5/1.1 kN

3.5/1.6 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

1%/0%

Tibia index R/L

.47/.43

.84/.45

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Escape is safer than the Jeep Cherokee:

 

Escape

Cherokee

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Chest Movement

.4 inches

.6 inches

Abdominal Force

96 G’s

176 G’s

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Warranty Comparison

There are over 38 percent more Ford dealers than there are Jeep dealers, which makes it easier should you ever need service under the Escape’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

A reliable vehicle saves its owner time, money and trouble. Nobody wants to be stranded or have to be without their vehicle while it’s being repaired. Consumer Reports predicts that the Escape’s reliability will be 226% better than the Cherokee.

J.D. Power and Associates rated the Escape third among compact suvs in their 2016 Initial Quality Study. The Cherokee isn’t in the top three.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2016 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Ford vehicles are better in initial quality than Jeep vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 11th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 11 more problems per 100 vehicles, Jeep is ranked 17th, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

The Escape has more powerful engines than the Cherokee:

 

Torque

Escape 1.5 turbo 4 cyl.

177 lbs.-ft.

Escape 2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

275 lbs.-ft.

Cherokee 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

171 lbs.-ft.

Cherokee 3.2 DOHC V6

239 lbs.-ft.

As tested in Motor Trend the Ford Escape turbo 4 cyl. is faster than the Jeep Cherokee 4 cyl.:

 

Escape

Cherokee

Zero to 60 MPH

8.9 sec

9.5 sec

Quarter Mile

16.7 sec

17.2 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

82.4 MPH

80.5 MPH

As tested in Motor Trend the Ford Escape 2.0 is faster than the Jeep Cherokee 3.2:

 

Escape

Cherokee

Zero to 60 MPH

6.8 sec

7.6 sec

Quarter Mile

15.2 sec

15.9 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

88.8 MPH

87.3 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Escape gets better fuel mileage than the Cherokee:

 

 

Escape

Cherokee

 

2WD

1.5 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

23 city/30 hwy

21 city/30 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

 

2.0 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

22 city/29 hwy

21 city/29 hwy

3.2 V6/Auto

4WD

n/a

21 city/28 hwy

2.4 4 cyl./Auto

 

1.5 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

22 city/28 hwy

20 city/27 hwy

3.2 V6/Auto

 

2.0 turbo 4 cyl./6-spd. Auto

20 city/27 hwy

18 city/24 hwy

3.2 V6/Auto

The Escape has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Cherokee doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Escape stops much shorter than the Cherokee:

 

Escape

Cherokee

 

60 to 0 MPH

116 feet

128 feet

Motor Trend

60 to 0 MPH (Wet)

139 feet

153 feet

Consumer Reports

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Escape has larger tires than the Cherokee (235/55R17 vs. 225/60R17).

The Escape’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 55 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Cherokee’s 65 series tires. The Escape’s optional tires have a lower 45 series profile than the Cherokee Limited’s 55 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Escape offers optional 19-inch wheels. The Cherokee’s largest wheels are only 18-inches.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Escape has standard front and rear gas-charged shocks for better control over choppy roads. The Cherokee’s suspension doesn’t offer gas-charged shocks.

The Escape has vehicle speed sensitive variable-assist power steering, for low-effort parking, better control at highway speeds and during hard cornering, and a better feel of the road. The Cherokee doesn’t offer variable-assist power steering.

The Escape Titanium AWD handles at .85 G’s, while the Cherokee Limited 4x4 pulls only .79 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Escape Titanium AWD executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1.3 seconds quicker than the Cherokee Trailhawk 4x4 (27.3 seconds @ .6 average G’s vs. 28.6 seconds @ .57 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

The Escape is 3.9 inches shorter than the Cherokee, making the Escape easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

As tested by Car and Driver, the interior of the Escape Titanium is quieter than the Cherokee Limited 4x4:

 

Escape

Cherokee

At idle

39 dB

44 dB

Full-Throttle

75 dB

77 dB

70 MPH Cruising

69 dB

69 dB

Passenger Space Comparison

The Escape has .5 inches more front headroom, 2 inches more front legroom, .7 inches more front hip room, .5 inches more rear headroom, 2.5 inches more rear hip room and .1 inches more rear shoulder room than the Cherokee.

The front step up height for the Escape is 1.1 inches lower than the Cherokee (16.8” vs. 17.9”). The Escape’s rear step up height is .6 inches lower than the Cherokee’s (17.5” vs. 18.1”).

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Escape has a much larger cargo area with its rear seat up than the Cherokee with its rear seat up (34 vs. 24.6 cubic feet). The Escape has a much larger cargo area with its rear seat folded than the Cherokee with its rear seat folded (68 vs. 54.9 cubic feet).

A low lift-over cargo hatch design makes loading and unloading the Escape easier. The Escape’s cargo hatch lift-over height is 27.3 inches, while the Cherokee’s liftover is 30.9 inches.

To make loading groceries and cargo easier when your hands are full, the Escape Titanium’s cargo door can be opened and closed just by kicking your foot under the back bumper, leaving your hands completely free. The Cherokee doesn’t offer a hands-free gesture to open its cargo door, forcing you to put cargo down if your hands are full.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Escape Titanium’s standard easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Cherokee doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The Escape’s standard driver’s power window opens or closes with one touch of the switch, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths. The Cherokee’s power window’s switch has to be held the entire time to close it fully. The Escape’s optional front and rear power windows all open or close fully with one touch of the switches. With the Cherokee Latitude/Limited/Trailhawk’s power windows, only the front windows open or close automatically.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Escape SE/Titanium’s exterior keypad. The Cherokee doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system, and its extra cost Uconnect Access can’t unlock the doors if the vehicle doesn’t have cell phone reception or the driver can’t contact the service.

The Escape’s standard speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The Cherokee’s standard manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted.

Consumer Reports rated the Escape’s headlight performance “Good,” a higher rating than the Cherokee’s headlights, which were rated “Poor” to “Fair” (depending on model and options).

The Escape has a standard automatic headlight on/off feature. When the ignition is on, the headlights automatically turn on at dusk and off after dawn. When the ignition turns off, the headlights turn off after a delay timed to allow you to securely get to your front door. The Cherokee has an automatic headlight on/off feature standard only on the Latitude/Limited/Trailhawk/Overland.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the Escape owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the Escape will cost $420 less than the Cherokee over a five-year period.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Escape is less expensive to operate than the Cherokee because typical repairs cost much less on the Escape than the Cherokee, including $29 less for a water pump, $534 less for an alternator, $77 less for front brake pads, $112 less for a starter, $205 less for fuel injection, $357 less for a fuel pump, $20 less for front struts and $142 less for a timing belt/chain.

IntelliChoice estimates that five-year ownership costs (depreciation, financing, insurance, fuel, fees, repairs and maintenance) for the Ford Escape will be $195 to $1087 less than for the Jeep Cherokee.

Recommendations Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates rated the Escape second among compact suvs in owner reported satisfaction. This includes how well the vehicle performs and satisfies its owner’s expectations. The Cherokee isn’t in the top three.

The Ford Escape outsold the Jeep Cherokee by 42% during the 2016 model year.

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