Jones Ford Buckeye Compares 2017 Ford Edge VS 2017 Hyundai Santa Near Surprise, AZ

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2017 Ford Edge

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VS

2017 Hyundai Santa

Safety Comparison

The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Edge and the Santa Fe have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Santa Fe:

 

Edge

Santa Fe

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Restraints

ACCEPTABLE

ACCEPTABLE

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

5 cm

8 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Femur Force R/L

2.2/1 kN

4.8/1.1 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

3%/0%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Tibia index R/L

.35/.47

1.18/.7

Tibia forces R/L

1/.5 kN

1.6/1 kN

Warranty Comparison

There are almost 5 times as many Ford dealers as there are Hyundai dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Edge’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

A reliable vehicle saves its owner time, money and trouble. Nobody wants to be stranded or have to be without their vehicle while it’s being repaired. Consumer Reports predicts that the Ford Edge V6’s reliability will be 8% better than the Santa Fe.

Engine Comparison

The Edge’s standard 2.0 turbo 4 cyl. produces 23 lbs.-ft. more torque (275 vs. 252) than the Santa Fe’s 3.3 DOHC V6. The Edge Sport’s standard 2.7 turbo V6 produces 25 more horsepower (315 vs. 290) and 98 lbs.-ft. more torque (350 vs. 252) than the Santa Fe’s 3.3 DOHC V6.

As tested in Motor Trend the Edge Sport 2.7 turbo V6 is faster than the Hyundai Santa Fe:

 

Edge

Santa Fe

Zero to 60 MPH

5.7 sec

7.3 sec

Quarter Mile

14.3 sec

15.8 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

95.9 MPH

89.1 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Edge SE 2.0 ECOBoost FWD offers an optional system to automatically turn off the engine when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The Santa Fe doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

The Edge has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Edge’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the Santa Fe are solid, not vented.

The Edge stops shorter than the Santa Fe:

 

Edge

Santa Fe

 

60 to 0 MPH

120 feet

125 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Edge has larger standard tires than the Santa Fe (245/60R18 vs. 235/60R18). The Edge Sport’s optional tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Santa Fe (265/40R21 vs. 235/60R18).

The Edge Sport’s optional tires provide better handling because they have a lower 40 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Santa Fe Ultimate’s 55 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Edge Sport offers optional 21-inch wheels. The Santa Fe’s largest wheels are only 19-inches.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Edge’s drift compensation steering can automatically compensate for road conditions which would cause the vehicle to drift from side to side, helping the driver to keep the vehicle straight more easily. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer drift compensation steering.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Edge’s wheelbase is 2 inches longer than on the Santa Fe (112.2 inches vs. 110.2 inches).

The Edge Sport AWD handles at .87 G’s, while the Santa Fe Limited AWD pulls only .74 G’s of cornering force in a Motor Trend skidpad test.

The Edge Sport AWD executes Motor Trend’s “Figure-Eight” maneuver 2.2 seconds quicker than the Santa Fe Limited AWD (26.2 seconds @ .72 average G’s vs. 28.4 seconds @ .59 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

The Edge is 5 inches shorter than the Santa Fe, making the Edge easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

The front grille of the Edge uses electronically controlled shutters to close off airflow and reduce drag when less engine cooling is needed. This helps improve highway fuel economy. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer active grille shutters.

The Edge Sport uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Edge has .3 inches more front headroom, 1.3 inches more front legroom, .9 inches more front shoulder room, .9 inches more rear headroom, .2 inches more rear legroom, 2.1 inches more rear hip room and 2.2 inches more rear shoulder room than the Santa Fe.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Edge has a much larger cargo area than the Santa Fe with its rear seat up (39.2 vs. 13.5 cubic feet).

Pressing a switch automatically lowers the Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s rear seats, to make changing between passengers and cargo easier. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer automatic folding seats.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

On a hot day the Edge’s driver can lower the front windows from a distance using the keyless remote. The driver of the Santa Fe can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s exterior keypad. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system, and its Blue Link can’t unlock the doors if the vehicle doesn’t have cell phone reception or the driver can’t contact the service.

The Edge SE/SEL’s standard speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The Santa Fe’s manually variable intermittent wipers have to be constantly adjusted. The Edge Titanium/Sport’s optional wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield.

The Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport offers optional automatic dimming rear and side view mirrors which automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on them, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The Santa Fe offers an automatic rear view mirror, but its side mirrors don’t dim.

The Edge Sport’s optional Active Park Assist can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The Santa Fe doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the Edge owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the Edge will cost $285 to $1235 less than the Santa Fe over a five-year period.

The Edge will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The IntelliChoice estimates that the Edge will retain 47.57% to 50.04% of its original price after five years, while the Santa Fe only retains 46.02% to 46.81%.

According to The Car Book by Jack Gillis, the Edge is less expensive to operate than the Santa Fe because it costs $216 less to do the manufacturer’s suggested maintenance for 50,000 miles. Typical repairs cost less on the Edge than the Santa Fe, including $17 less for front struts and $176 less for a power steering pump.

Recommendations Comparison

The Car Book by Jack Gillis recommends the Ford Edge, based on economy, maintenance, safety and complaint levels.

J.D. Power and Associates rated the Edge second among midsize suvs in owner reported satisfaction. This includes how well the vehicle performs and satisfies its owner’s expectations. The Santa Fe isn’t in the top three.

The Ford Edge outsold the Hyundai Santa Fe by 3455 units during the 2016 model year.

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