Jones Ford Buckeye Compares 2017 Ford Edge VS 2017 Honda CR-V Near Goodyear, AZ

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2017 Ford Edge

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VS

2017 Honda CR-V

Safety Comparison

The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The CR-V doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional 180 degree camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The CR-V only offers a rear monitor.

Both the Edge and the CR-V have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, height adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

Warranty Comparison

There are almost 3 times as many Ford dealers as there are Honda dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Edge’s warranty.

Reliability Comparison

To reliably start during all conditions and help handle large electrical loads, the Edge has a standard 590-amp battery. The CR-V’s 410-amp battery isn’t as powerful.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2016 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Ford vehicles are better in initial quality than Honda vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 11th in initial quality, above the industry average. With 17 more problems per 100 vehicles, Honda is ranked 23rd, below the industry average.

Engine Comparison

The Edge has more powerful engines than the CR-V:

 

Horsepower

Torque

Edge 2.0 turbo 4 cyl.

245 HP

275 lbs.-ft.

Edge 3.5 DOHC V6

280 HP

250 lbs.-ft.

Edge Sport 2.7 turbo V6

315 HP

350 lbs.-ft.

CR-V LX 2.4 DOHC 4 cyl.

184 HP

180 lbs.-ft.

CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring 1.5 turbo 4 cyl.

190 HP

179 lbs.-ft.

As tested in Car and Driver the Edge Sport 2.7 turbo V6 is faster than the CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring 1.5 turbo 4 cyl.:

 

Edge

CR-V

Zero to 30 MPH

1.9 sec

2.9 sec

Zero to 60 MPH

5.6 sec

7.6 sec

Zero to 80 MPH

9.3 sec

12.9 sec

Zero to 100 MPH

14.8 sec

21.5 sec

5 to 60 MPH Rolling Start

6.2 sec

8.1 sec

Passing 30 to 50 MPH

3.1 sec

4.2 sec

Passing 50 to 70 MPH

4.1 sec

5.3 sec

Quarter Mile

14.2 sec

16 sec

Speed in 1/4 Mile

98 MPH

89 MPH

Top Speed

132 MPH

124 MPH

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the Edge SE 2.0 ECOBoost FWD offers an optional system to automatically turn off the engine when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The CR-V doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

The Edge FWD’s standard fuel tank has 4.3 gallons more fuel capacity than the CR-V (18.3 vs. 14 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups. The Edge AWD’s standard fuel tank has 5.2 gallons more fuel capacity than the CR-V (19.2 vs. 14 gallons).

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Edge’s standard front and rear disc brakes are vented to help dissipate heat for shorter stops with less fading. The rear discs on the CR-V are solid, not vented.

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Edge has larger standard tires than the CR-V (245/60R18 vs. 235/65R17). The Edge Sport’s optional tires are larger than the largest tires available on the CR-V (265/40R21 vs. 235/65R17).

The Edge SE/SEL’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 60 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the CR-V LX’s standard 65 series tires. The Edge Sport’s optional tires have a lower 40 series profile than the CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s 60 series tires.

For better ride, handling and brake cooling the Edge SE/SEL has standard 18-inch wheels. Smaller 17-inch wheels are standard on the CR-V LX. The Edge Sport’s optional 21-inch wheels are larger than the 18-inch wheels on the CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Edge has standard front and rear gas-charged shocks for better control over choppy roads. The CR-V’s suspension doesn’t offer gas-charged shocks.

The Edge’s drift compensation steering can automatically compensate for road conditions which would cause the vehicle to drift from side to side, helping the driver to keep the vehicle straight more easily. The CR-V doesn’t offer drift compensation steering.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Edge’s wheelbase is 7.5 inches longer than on the CR-V (112.2 inches vs. 104.7 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Edge is 1.8 inches wider in the front and 1.1 inches wider in the rear than the average track on the CR-V.

The Edge Sport AWD handles at .83 G’s, while the CR-V Touring AWD pulls only .82 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Edge Sport AWD executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1.7 seconds quicker than the CR-V Touring AWD (26.2 seconds @ .72 average G’s vs. 27.9 seconds @ .6 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

As tested by Car and Driver, the interior of the Edge Titanium AWD is quieter than the CR-V Touring AWD:

 

Edge

CR-V

At idle

40 dB

40 dB

Full-Throttle

71 dB

78 dB

70 MPH Cruising

68 dB

69 dB

Passenger Space Comparison

The Edge has 8 cubic feet more passenger volume than the CR-V (113.9 vs. 105.9).

The Edge has .1 inches more front headroom, 1.3 inches more front legroom, .8 inches more front hip room, 2.4 inches more front shoulder room, 1.1 inches more rear headroom, .2 inches more rear legroom, 8 inches more rear hip room and 4.9 inches more rear shoulder room than the CR-V.

For enhanced passenger comfort on long trips the Edge’s rear seats recline. The CR-V’s rear seats don’t recline.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Edge Titanium/Sport’s standard easy entry system raises the steering wheel and glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The CR-V doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The power windows standard on both the Edge and the CR-V have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the Edge is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The CR-V prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

The Edge’s front power windows open or close fully with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The CR-V’s standard passenger windows don’t open or close automatically. The CR-V EX/EX-L/Touring’s rear windows don’t close automatically.

On a hot day the Edge’s driver can lower the front windows from a distance using the keyless remote. The driver of the CR-V can’t use the remote to operate the windows.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s exterior keypad. The CR-V doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system.

The Edge SE/SEL’s standard speed-sensitive wipers speed up when the vehicle does, so that the driver doesn’t have to continually adjust the speed of the wipers. The CR-V LX’s standard fixed intermittent wipers only have one fixed delay setting, so the driver will have to manually switch them between slow and intermittent.

The Edge has a standard automatic headlight on/off feature. When the ignition is on, the headlights automatically turn on at dusk and off after dawn. The CR-V has an automatic headlight on/off feature standard only on the EX/EX-L/Touring.

The Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport offers optional automatic dimming rear and side view mirrors which automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on them, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The CR-V offers an automatic rear view mirror, but its side mirrors don’t dim.

Both the Edge and the CR-V offer available heated front seats. The Edge Titanium/Sport also offers optional heated rear seats to keep those passengers extremely comfortable in the winter. Heated rear seats aren’t available in the CR-V.

Optional air-conditioned seats in the Edge Titanium/Sport keep the driver and front passenger comfortable and take the sting out of hot seats in Summer. The CR-V doesn’t offer air-conditioned seats.

On extremely cold Winter days, the Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s optional heated steering wheel provides comfort, allowing the driver to steer safely and comfortably before the vehicle heater warms up. The CR-V doesn’t offer a heated steering wheel.

The Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport offers an optional 115-volt a/c outlet on the center console, allowing you to recharge a laptop or run small household appliances without special adapters that can break or get misplaced. The CR-V doesn’t offer a house-current electrical outlet.

The Edge Sport’s optional Active Park Assist can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The CR-V doesn’t offer an automated parking system.

Recommendations Comparison

The Ford Edge has won recognition from these important consumer publications:

 

Edge

CR-V

Consumer Reports® Recommends

TRUE

n/a

Car Book “Best Bet”

TRUE

n/a

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