Jones Ford Buckeye Compares 2010 Ford Taurus VS 2010 Dodge Charger Near Peoria, AZ

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2010 Ford Taurus

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VS

2010 Dodge Charger

Safety Comparison

The Taurus has standard four-wheel antilock disc brakes for quicker stops and controlled steering ability, especially under poor traction conditions. Antilock brakes cost extra on the Dodge Charger.

The Taurus Limited/SHO offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The system also pre-charges the brakes to begin deceleration more quickly. The Charger doesn't offer a collision warning system.

The Taurus has standard AdvanceTrac®, which uses the antilock brake hardware along with powerful software and additional sensors to detect the beginning of a skid. The AdvanceTrac® then intervenes by automatically applying the brake at one appropriate wheel, preventing a skid. A skid prevention system costs extra on the Charger. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed that skid control systems reduced single-vehicle car crashes by 30%.

The Taurus (except SE) offers optional Reverse Sensing System to help warn drivers about vehicles, pedestrians or other obstacles behind their vehicle. The Taurus SHO also offers an optional backup monitor to help drivers see any and all obstacles behind their vehicle. The Charger doesn’t offer any parking assist system.

The Taurus Limited/SHO’s optional blind spot warning system uses rear-aimed sensors monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The Charger doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver's blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Taurus Limited/SHO’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Charger doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Taurus offers optional SYNC, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Charger doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Taurus and the Charger have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks and available all-wheel drive.

In a 31 MPH side-impact test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashes a 3300 pound sled into the side of new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Taurus is safer than the Charger:

Taurus

Charger

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Structure

ACCEPTABLE

ACCEPTABLE

Driver

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

POOR

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Injury Criterion

123

380

Shoulder Movement

37 mm

63 mm

Rear Passenger

Head Protection Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Head Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Torso Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

Pelvis/Leg Injury Rating

GOOD

GOOD

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the general design of front seat head restraints for their ability to protect front seat occupants from whiplash injuries. The IIHS also performs a dynamic test on those seats with “good” or “acceptable” geometry. In these ratings, the Taurus with leather seats is safer then the Charger:

Taurus

Charger

Overall Evaluation

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Head Restraint Design

GOOD

GOOD

Distance Below Top of Head

22 mm

52 mm

Dynamic Test Rating

GOOD

ACCEPTABLE

Seat Design

Pass

Pass

Torso Acceleration

10.1 g’s

12 g’s

Neck Force Rating

Low

Medium

Max Neck Shearing Force

16

79

Max Neck Tension

545

787

(Lower numerical results are better in all tests.)

For its top level performance in frontal, side and rear impact tests, and its standard AdvanceTrac®, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rates the Taurus as a “Top Pick” a rating only granted to 90 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Charger was not a Top Pick.

Warranty Comparison

The Taurus comes with free roadside assistance for 5 years 60,000 miles. Ford will send help if you run out of gas, need a jump start, lock your keys in or need any assistance on the road. Dodge doesn’t give free roadside assistance for the Charger.

The Taurus’ 5 year corrosion warranty has no mileage limitations, but the corrosion warranty on the Charger runs out after 100,000 miles.

There are over 33 percent more Ford dealers than there are Dodge dealers, which makes it easier to get service under the Taurus’ warranty.

Reliability Comparison

The camshafts in the Taurus’ engine are driven by a hardened steel chain, with no maintenance needs. The Charger SXT 3.5 SOHC V6’s camshafts are driven by a rubber belt that eventually needs to be replaced. If the Charger’s cam drive belt breaks the engine could be severely damaged when the pistons hit the opened valves.

For smoother operation, better efficiency and fewer moving parts, the engines in the Taurus have an overhead cam design, rather than the old pushrod design of some of the engines in the Charger.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2009 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that Ford vehicles are better in initial quality than Dodge vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 8th in initial quality. With 32 more problems per 100 vehicles, Dodge is ranked 28th.

J.D. Power and Associates’ surveys of the owners of three-year-old cars provide the long-term dependability statistics that show that Ford vehicles are more reliable than Dodge vehicles. J.D. Power ranks Ford 10th in reliability, above the industry average. With 43 more problems per 100 vehicles, Dodge is ranked 22nd.

Engine Comparison

The Taurus has more powerful engines than the Charger:

Horsepower

Torque

Taurus 3.5 DOHC V6

263 HP

249 lbs.-ft.

Taurus SHO 3.5 turbo V6

365 HP

350 lbs.-ft.

Charger SE 2.7 DOHC V6

178 HP

190 lbs.-ft.

Charger SXT 3.5 SOHC V6

250 HP

250 lbs.-ft.

For more instantaneous acceleration and better engine flexibility in any gear, the Taurus’ engines produce their peak torque at lower RPM’s than the Charger:

Torque

Taurus SHO 3.5 turbo V6

1500 RPM

Charger SE 2.7 DOHC V6

4000 RPM

Charger SXT 3.5 SOHC V6

3800 RPM

Charger R/T 5.7 V8

4250 RPM

Charger R/T 5.7 V8

4400 RPM

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Taurus gets better fuel mileage than the Charger:

Taurus

Charger

2WD

3.5 V6/6-spd Auto

18 city/28 hwy

18 city/26 hwy

2.7 V6/Auto

3.5 V6/6-spd Auto

18 city/27 hwy

17 city/25 hwy

3.5 V6/Auto

n/a

16 city/25 hwy

5.7 V8 (368 HP)/Auto

AWD

3.5 V6/6-spd Auto

17 city/25 hwy

17 city/23 hwy

3.5 V6/Auto

3.5 turbo V6/Auto

17 city/25 hwy

16 city/23 hwy

5.7 V8 (368 HP)/Auto

The Taurus AWD’s standard fuel tank has a gallon more fuel capacity than the Charger SE/SXT RWD’s standard fuel tank (19 vs. 18 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups. The Taurus FWD’s standard fuel tank has a gallon more fuel capacity than the Charger AWD/RT’s standard fuel tank (20 vs. 19 gallons).

 

The Taurus has a standard capless fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation that causes pollution. The Charger doesn’t offer a capless fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Taurus’ standard brake rotors are larger than those on the Charger:

Taurus

Charger

Front Rotors

12.8 inches

12.6 inches

Rear Rotors

13 inches

12.6 inches

The Taurus with its standard antilock brakes stops much shorter than the Charger with antilock brakes:

Taurus

Charger

80 to 0 MPH

216 feet

240 feet

Road & Track

70 to 0 MPH

174 feet

187 feet

Car and Driver

60 to 0 MPH

112 feet

137 feet

Motor Trend

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Taurus has larger standard tires than the Charger (235/60R17 vs. 215/65R17). The Taurus’ optional tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Charger (255/45R19 vs. 245/45R20).

The Taurus SE’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 60 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Charger SE/SXT’s standard 65 series tires.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Taurus has standard front and rear stabilizer bars, which help keep the Taurus flat and controlled during cornering. The Charger’s standard suspension doesn’t offer a rear stabilizer bar.

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Taurus is 2.3 inches wider in the front and 2.4 inches wider in the rear than on the Charger.

The Taurus SHO AWD handles at .88 G’s, while the Charger R/T pulls only .77 G’s of cornering force in a Road & Track skidpad test.

The Taurus SHO AWD goes through Road & Track’s slalom 3.4 MPH faster than the Charger R/T (64.8 vs. 61.4 MPH).

The Taurus SHO AWD executes Motor Trend’s “Figure Eight” maneuver 1 seconds quicker than the Charger R/T (26.8 seconds @ .7 average G’s vs. 27.8 seconds @ .63 average G’s).

Chassis Comparison

To almost totally eliminate engine vibration in the passenger area, the Taurus has liquid-filled engine mounts. The liquid helps further dampen engine harshness. The Charger uses conventional solid rubber engine mounts.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Taurus has .3 inches more front headroom, .1 inches more front legroom, .1 inches more front hip room, 1.6 inches more rear headroom and .3 inches more rear hip room than the Charger.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Taurus has a much larger trunk than the Charger (20.1 vs. 16.2 cubic feet).

Ergonomics Comparison

When two different drivers share the Taurus Limited/SHO, the memory system makes it convenient for both. Each setting activates different, customized memories for the driver’s seat position, foot pedal distance and outside mirror angle. The Charger doesn’t offer a memory system.

The Taurus Limited/SHO’s standard easy entry system glides the driver’s seat back when the door is unlocked or the ignition is switched off, making it easier for the driver to get in and out. The Charger doesn’t offer an easy entry system.

The Taurus’ standard driver’s power window opens or closes with one touch of the window control, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths. The Charger’s standard driver’s power window switch has to be held the entire time to close it fully.

On a hot day the Taurus’ driver can lower the front windows using the key in the outside lock cylinder or the keyless remote (Taurus Limited/SHO). The driver of the Charger can only operate the windows from inside the vehicle, with the ignition on.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the exterior keypad. The Charger doesn’t offer an exterior keypad entry system.

The Taurus Limited/SHO’s optional wipers adjust their speed and turn on and off automatically according to the amount of rainfall on the windshield. The Charger’s intermittent wipers change speed with vehicle speed, but can’t turn on and off or change speed based on changing rainfall.

The Taurus has a standard automatic headlight on/off feature. When the ignition is on, the headlights automatically turn on at dusk and off after dawn. When the ignition turns off, the headlights turn off after a delay timed to allow you to securely get to your front door. The Charger only offers an automatic headlight on/off feature as an extra cost option.

While driving with high-beams on, sensitive light sensors available for the Taurus Limited/SHO detect other vehicles that could be blinded and automatically switch to low-beams. The Charger doesn’t offer automatic dimming high-beams.

A power rear sun shade is optional in the Taurus Limited/SHO to help block heat and glare for the rear passengers. The Charger doesn’t offer a rear sun shade.

The Taurus offers optional automatic dimming rear and side view mirrors which automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on them, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The Charger has an automatic rear view mirror, but its side mirrors don’t dim.

The Taurus’ optional heated front seats keep the driver and front passenger extremely comfortable in the winter. The Charger SE doesn’t offer heated seats.

The Taurus Limited/SHO’s optional air conditioned front seats cool the driver and front passenger and help take the sting out of hot leather in Summer. The Charger doesn’t offer air conditioned front seats.

The Taurus SEL/Limited/SHO’s standard dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. The Charger SE doesn’t offer dual zone air conditioning.

To keep a safe, consistent following distance, the Taurus Limited/SHO offers an optional adaptive cruise control, which alters the speed of the vehicle without driver intervention. This allows the driver to use cruise control more safely without constantly having to disengage it when approaching slower traffic. The Charger doesn’t offer an adaptive cruise control.

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