Jones Ford Buckeye - How does a 2017 Ford Edge compare to its competition in Safety Near Goodyear, AZ?


 
  • Jones Ford Buckeye Journal
  • Apr 1st 2017 - 233 days ago
  • Goodyear, AZ
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Compared To BMW X4 2017



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Ford Edge are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The BMW X4 doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The X4 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Edge and the X4 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To GMC Acadia 2017



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Ford Edge are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The GMC Acadia doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Acadia doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Edge and the Acadia have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front-wheel drive, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Land Rover Discovery Sport 2017



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Ford Edge are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Land Rover Discovery Sport doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Discovery Sport doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Edge and the Discovery Sport have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Mitsubishi Outlander 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Outlander doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional 180-degree camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Outlander only offers a rear monitor and front and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the sides.

Compared to metal, the Edge’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Mitsubishi Outlander has a metal gas tank.

The Edge offers optional 911 Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Outlander doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Edge and the Outlander have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.




Compared To Dodge Journey 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Journey doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The Journey doesn\'t offer a collision warning system.

The Edge Titanium/Sport’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Journey doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional 180-degree camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Journey only offers a rear monitor and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the front or sides.

The Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s optional blind spot warning system uses digital cameras monitored by computer to alert the driver to moving objects in the vehicle’s blind spots where the side view mirrors don’t reveal them. The Journey doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

To help make backing safer, the Edge SEL/Titanium/Sport’s optional cross-path warning system uses wide-angle radar in the rear bumper to alert the driver to vehicles approaching from the side, helping the driver avoid collisions. The Journey doesn’t offer a cross-path warning system.

The Edge offers optional 911 Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Journey doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Edge and the Journey have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, driver knee airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights and available all-wheel drive.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Dodge Journey:

 

Edge

Journey

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

 

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Journey:

 

Edge

Journey

Overall Evaluation

ACCEPTABLE

POOR

Restraints

ACCEPTABLE

MARGINAL

Head Neck Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Head injury index

78

98

Peak Head Forces

0 G’s

0 G’s

Steering Column Movement Rearward

5 cm

12 cm

Chest Evaluation

GOOD

GOOD

Hip & Thigh Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Femur Force R/L

2.2/1 kN

6.3/2.9 kN

Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L

0%/0%

22%/0%

Lower Leg Evaluation

GOOD

MARGINAL

Tibia index R/L

.35/.47

.8/.83

Tibia forces R/L

1/.5 kN

1/2 kN

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Dodge Journey:

 

Edge

Journey

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

71

106

Chest Movement

.6 inches

1 inches

Abdominal Force

118 G’s

138 G’s

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

114

135

Hip Force

647 lbs.

973 lbs.

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Hip Force

585 lbs.

953 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To GMC Terrain 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Terrain doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional 180-degree camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Terrain only offers a rear monitor and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the front or sides.

Both the Edge and the Terrain have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the GMC Terrain:

 

Edge

Terrain

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

 

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the GMC Terrain:

 

Edge

Terrain

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

71

79

Chest Movement

.6 inches

1.4 inches

Abdominal Force

118 G’s

180 G’s

Hip Force

281 lbs.

547 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

114

256

Spine Acceleration

45 G’s

48 G’s

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

297

341

Spine Acceleration

53 G’s

63 G’s

Hip Force

585 lbs.

684 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To Chevrolet Equinox 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The Equinox doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

The Edge Titanium/Sport offers an optional 180-degree camera to allow the driver to see objects all around the vehicle on a screen. The Equinox only offers a rear monitor and rear parking sensors that beep or flash a light. That doesn’t help with obstacles to the front or sides.

Both the Edge and the Equinox have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Chevrolet Equinox:

 

Edge

Equinox

OVERALL STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

 

Passenger

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Chevrolet Equinox:

 

Edge

Equinox

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

4 Stars

HIC

71

79

Chest Movement

.6 inches

1.4 inches

Abdominal Force

118 G’s

180 G’s

Hip Force

281 lbs.

547 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

114

256

Spine Acceleration

45 G’s

48 G’s

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

297

341

Spine Acceleration

53 G’s

63 G’s

Hip Force

585 lbs.

684 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.




Compared To Volvo XC60 2017



The rear seatbelts optional on the Edge inflate when a collision is detected, helping to spread crash forces over a much larger area of the body and limiting head and neck movement. This can help prevent spinal and internal injuries. The XC60 doesn’t offer inflatable seatbelts.

Both the Edge and the XC60 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front-wheel drive, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available all-wheel drive, collision warning systems, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, around view monitors and rear cross-path warning.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Ford Edge is safer than the Volvo XC60:

 

Edge

XC60

 

Front Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Chest Movement

.6 inches

.8 inches

Abdominal Force

118 G’s

167 G’s

Hip Force

281 lbs.

345 lbs.

 

Rear Seat

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

HIC

114

232

 

Into Pole

STARS

5 Stars

5 Stars

Max Damage Depth

18 inches

18 inches

Hip Force

585 lbs.

721 lbs.

New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.