A head to head comparison of a 2016 Ford Focus to a 2015 Honda Civic Hybrid in Ergonomics.


 
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  • Nov 20th 2017 - 406 days ago
  • Phoenix, AZ
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Compared To Honda Civic Hybrid 2015



The Focus automatic offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver\'s house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The engine computer on the Focus automatically engages the starter until the car starts with one twist of the key and disables the starter while the engine is running. The Civic Hybrid’s starter can be accidentally engaged while the engine is running, making a grinding noise and possibly damaging the starter and ring gear.

The power windows standard on both the Focus and the Civic Hybrid have locks to prevent small children from operating them. When the lock on the Focus is engaged the driver can still operate all of the windows, for instance to close one opened by a child. The Civic Hybrid prevents the driver from operating the other windows just as it does the other passengers.

The Focus Titanium’s front and rear power windows all open or close fully with one touch of the switches, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths, or when talking with someone outside the car. The Civic Hybrid’s passenger windows don’t open or close automatically.

In case you lock your keys in your vehicle, or don’t have them with you, you can let yourself in using the Focus’ available exterior PIN entry system. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer an exterior PIN entry system.

Intelligent Access standard on the Focus Titanium allows you to unlock the driver’s door, trunk and start the engine all without removing a key from pocket or purse. This eliminates searching for keys before loading groceries, getting in the vehicle in bad weather or making a hurried start to your trip. The Honda Civic Hybrid’s Smart Entry Keyless Remote doesn’t unlock the trunk.

The Focus’ optional rear view mirror has an automatic dimming feature. This mirror can be set to automatically darken quickly when headlights shine on it, keeping following vehicles from blinding or distracting the driver. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer the luxury of an automatic dimming rear view mirror.

On extremely cold Winter days, the Focus SE/Titanium’s optional heated steering wheel provides comfort, allowing the driver to steer safely and comfortably before the car heater warms up. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer a heated steering wheel.

The Focus offers an optional center folding armrest for the rear passengers. A center armrest helps make rear passengers more comfortable. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer a rear seat center armrest.

The Focus (except S)’s optional dual zone air conditioning allows the driver and front passenger to choose two completely different temperatures so people with different temperature preferences won’t have to compromise. This makes both the driver and front passenger as comfortable as possible. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer dual zone air conditioning.

The Focus Titanium’s optional Active Park Assist can parallel park or back into a parking spot by itself, with the driver only controlling speed with the brake pedal. The Civic Hybrid doesn’t offer an automated parking system.